Category Archives: Women

The more things change the more they stay the same.

Ten years ago this August the United Nations completed the negotiations for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, (CRPD.) at the UN in New York. It was a huge relief that the wheeling and dealing was over, and we’d got much of what we wanted. Of course the real work was just beginning. But we all set off to party on that hot August night.

Disabled people in New Zealand were optimistic about the CRPD and the leading role New Zealand had taken in its development. The first NZ Disability Strategy was still fresh, the Sign Language Act was passed that year and the last of the big institutions was closing. The Disabled Persons Employment Promotion Act, which allowed sheltered workshops to avoid employment rights for many disabled workers, was repealed the following year. As a result of all of the above, New Zealand won the prestigious Franklin Delano Roosevelt International Disability Award for 2007.

Ten years later how has implementation of the CRPD fared?

The New Zealand government ratified the CRPD in 2008, and is showing willing to ratify the optional protocol. The government is positive about ratifying the Marrakesh Treaty, but needs encouragement. We have a disability rights human rights commissioner, disabled people’s organisations are working more closely with government, and the sixteen-year-old Disability Strategy is finally being reviewed.

But I have a sense of unease and disillusion in the disability community. As always money is tight. The Convention Coalition set up as part of the monitoring mechanism for the CRPD seems to have lost its funding and there aren’t seats around the government table for groups of disabled people who don’t have their own national representative organisations. The same old issues are raising their heads with depressing lack of progress among the now 24% of New Zealanders who are disabled.

  • There are problems with exclusion and the funding of “special” education.
  • Maori and Pacific disabled people are behind others in most social indicators
  • There is a small group of vulnerable disabled people who aren’t criminals detained without redress for significant lengths of time.
  • Disabled women in New Zealand still have no strong national voice of our own.
  • Access to the built environment, NZS4121 and enforcing legislation are desperately in need of review, reform and modernising.
  • There is no sign of legislative reform and change in mental health provisions and the Adoption Act, contentious at the time of the CRPD ratification.
  • Assisted decision making does not seem to be on the public agenda
  • Employment remains an intractable issue
  • There is no indication that the troubling inequity between health and ACC services will change
  • Disability data formerly collected with the census will be collected less regularly and there is unease about disability data and how it will be gathered.
  • Safety and fear of violence and abuse are common, and related community services are not dealing well with disabled people.
  • Government and other public web sites are not as accessible as they should be.
  • Disabled people’s representative organisations are stretched and under-resourced and need time and space to develop their own agendas.
  • Disabled people worry about negative public attitudes and behaviour and media coverage and portrayal.
  • The consultations on the draft disability strategy raised concern about the lack of a strategic approach and an individual rather than  a systemic and structural focus. Disabled people are also suspicious about accountability and impatient with the extended time frame for implementing the new strategy.
  • Act MP David Seymour recently referred to the 24% of disabled New Zealanders as “a worthy cause.”

There is still much to be done.

Years ago I used to say, half-jokingly, that I would be old and grey before there is any real substantial change. I am now old and grey, and, sadly, my facetious prediction seems to have come true.

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Filed under Disability Rights, Inclusion, Information Accessibility, Web Accessibility, Women

International women’s day 2016 – Women’s Studies conference

Here’s my contribution to International Women’s Day. From the Women’s Studies Association

First Announcement:
Conference of the Women’s Studies Association (NZ)/Pae Akoranga Wahine
University of Auckland, Friday 2/Saturday 3 September 2016
Conference theme:
New Landscapes in Feminism and Women’s Studies
Programme themes include:

• new feminisms
• all our futures: women and ageing.
• feminist theory meets intersectionality
• women in diverse communities
• climate, place, environment
• new technologies
• violence against women: new thinking on enduring challenges
• solving conundrums around inequalities
• memorialising women
Expect an exciting line-up of guest speakers
A call for papers will be circulated shortly
Submission deadlines:
• peer-reviewed stream : April 15th 2016
• non peer-reviewed papers : June 10th 2016

I have posted several times on the inclusion, or rather exclusion of disabled women in relation to feminist discourse. The questions I have raised are still important. This conference looks as if there may be some opportunities for disabled women to contribute. But the old questions still remain. Are we academic enough? Will we feel welcome?

We are, of course, part of the ageing population, but will other ageing women be able to accept disability feminist analysis. Will we still be at the bottom of the intersectional list as usual? Is our brand of diversity an OK part of feminism yet? Will the new-tech theme recognise us and our contributions? We know about inequality but will the conference address it in practice, and we watch our herstory vanish or be rewritten by others each day? Will there be a disabled woman speaking in that “exciting lineup”?

Can we contribute? Do we want to? Are our voices important and strong enough or are we, along with everyone else, content for the status quo to continue? Of course our part of the landscape isn’t really new at all. We’ve been there all the time, in plain sight.

Probably enough questions for one post I think.

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Filed under Disability Issues, Disability Rights, Inclusion, Women

Mourning our disabled dead

Disabled people have for many years watched a pattern emerging in disability deaths. A parent kills their disabled child. (The “child” may be an adult.) These murders are portrayed in the media and elsewhere as a justifiable and an almost inevitable result of the “burden” of having a disabled person in the family. These deaths are frequently framed euphemistically as “mercy killing”.

Usually the parent is offered public sympathy. If they stand trial, they are treated with leniency. Even if convicted, usually of a lesser crime than murder, they rarely serve jail time.

The victims are relegated to the margins of the crime, even blamed for their own murder and soon forgotten. Each instance reinforces the narrative that disability is so terrible that parents are driven by it to kill their own children to lessen their suffering.

But these disabled people have died at the hands of someone they should have been able to trust the most, someone who ought to have protected them from harm, someone with a recognised responsibility in law to do just that.

On Tuesday, March 1st, the disability community will gather in several countries to remember disabled victims of filicide–disabled people murdered by their family members or caregivers. They are joining together to mourn the lives lost to domestic violence and murder, to bring the deaths into the public consciousness as a human rights issue.

In the same way as for everyone else, domestic violence towards disabled people is not OK. Disabled people killed by their families are entitled to justice  and equal protection under the law. Formal reporting of disability domestic violence deaths along with other domestic violence deaths by the Family Violence Death Review Committee, and inclusion of disabled people in domestic violence services and campaigns are all necessary immediately.

Our project, The New Zealand Disability Clothesline,  is compiling a list of the deaths we know about that are in the public arena with the names of murdered disabled people.

The New Zealand and Australian clothesline projects, campaigning projects against violence and abuse towards disabled people, are joining the vigil to mourn the lives of murdered disabled people this year on March 1 with an online vigil. You can join in our Disability Killings vigil-Trans Tasman Day of Mourning on Facebook.

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Filed under Disability Issues, Disability Rights, Inclusion, Media, Women

Three disability Christmas wishes 2014

This time last year I wrote a Christmas blog with three wishes. Doing it again might mean I lack imagination. Last year’s wishes have certainly not been magically granted. But Christmas is the time of wishful thinking, so here is mine for another year.

My first wish is that the great team of audio describers we trained earlier this year will have lots of work next year, for theatre, civic events such as parades, operas and other musical events, and in museums galleries, and even sports events where TV may not provide an adequate commentary or any coverage at all.

My second wish is that that the New Zealand Government decides to ratify the Marrakesh Treaty to increase the amount of copyright material available in alternative formats to print-disabled New Zealanders.

My third wish, and dreams are free, is that there is a concentrated effort to include disabled women and children in family violence services, as well as action to protect disabled women and men from abuse in disability support services of all kinds.

So there are three more wishes. A very happy Christmas and a safe and restful break to all my readers. May 2015 make all our disability wishes come true.

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Filed under Accessible Engagement, Disability Issues, Disability Rights, Inclusion, The Arts, Women